See Me As I Am

Posted: January 14, 2015 in Friday Fictioneers

PHOTO PROMPT - Copyright - Jan Wayne Fields

Pierre resented his parents for never acknowledging he was gay.
He’d played with dolls as a child – pretty ones with golden hair.
Worn Mum’s panties at sixteen – she’d caught him.
He told his dad he wanted to own a flower shop,
not a car repair shop. “Buck up! Be a man!” His father shouted.
But wasn’t he still a man? Wasn’t he?

Tonight was the night.
Best china, caviar, steak, wine . . .
and an introduction to Luke. Dear Luke.
He’d get the worst of it – shouting, crying, damnation.
And that would be before Pierre told Mum and Dad he was dying of Aids.

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Comments
  1. Sandra says:

    Now that’s what you call a double-whammy! Oh dear, those parents will be totally devastated. What an unusual take on the prompt. Well done. (Were you having trouble with the linky thing as well today?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Sandra. This poor fellow looks so forlorn, although the table is quite festive. The linky thing was very small – no little frog, but I had no trouble getting in. Inlinkz is sometimes a challenge, isn’t it? But it always comes through in the end. Have a great day. Alicia

      Liked by 1 person

  2. When parents have their world turned around.. I wonder if they will be able to choose between their love of a son or principles.. a great story captured.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Not a night I envy. I, too, hope their love sees them through and brings them back together as a family.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Wow that’s going to be a hell of a night.
    Claire

    Liked by 1 person

  5. What a sucker punch story, I really felt it. Such a tragedy…

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I was also going to say sucker punched but it was used several times before me. It was a shock in the heart. 😦

    Like

  7. Thanks for sharing. I had a friend who died of aids years and years ago. He was the sweetest man I’ve ever known (except for my husband, of course, Oh! and my dad – done with the list now)

    Like

  8. plaridel says:

    they must have thought that they failed as parents. but it wasn’t because they had a gay son. rather, it was because they failed to support and accept him for what he was.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Sad tale, well-told, Alicia. But maybe he has longer than he thinks, if Dallas Buyer’s Club is to be believed. Many good lines in this piece: ” But wasn’t he still a man? Wasn’t he?”

    Liked by 1 person

  10. draliman says:

    Such a rough life and then that bombshell at the end. I wonder if his parents will finally support him in the light of this news?

    Liked by 1 person

  11. BrainRants says:

    He’s fermented quite a lot of bitterness, and planned out his night’s two main punctuation marks.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Powerful, poignant, and perfect. Big story in few words. Nice!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Dear Alicia,

    They say love conquers all. I hope Pierre’s family is up for it. Beautifully told story that packs a powerful punch.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  14. dmmacilroy says:

    Dear Alicia,

    Love is the answer and it is never more clearly illustrated than in your splendid story of love and (I wish) acceptance. So well done, Alicia.

    (On a technical note, and only for your consideration… the last word perhaps ought to be capitalized or perhaps even all caps, indicating the disease/syndrome.)

    Aloha,

    Doug

    Liked by 1 person

  15. MrBinks says:

    Ouch! What a kicker! Really well told. Great pace and extremely desperate. Loved it.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Margaret says:

    A tragic story. How sad for many people who have to go through this kind of thing. You’ve given us his life story in a nutshelld, and shown the agony of his current situation. I hope his family surprises him.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. A florist load of sadness here. Neighbours of ours have a similar story except it’s cancer (he’s only 19 and has ‘months’ to live), and the being gay wasn’t a problem for anyone involved, thank heaven.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cancer is a mean, mean disease. I just found out a friend of mine has a gay son – she sent his wedding picture in her Christmas card. Both young men looked over the moon happy. When I Facebooked her and told her that, she replied, “The only thing a parent wants is for her children to be happy.” Made me smile.

      Like

  18. Love the twist at the end. Such a tragically good story. I’m not sure his parents are up to accepting the news of his illness.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Thanks, Lisa, I think his parents have their heads in the sand.

    Like

  20. rgayer55 says:

    As a parent of a lesbian daughter, I can honestly say they just need to get over it. A lot of gay people have committed suicide because of the lack of acceptance by those who should be showing unconditional love. Sure, I always dreamed my daughter would grow up, marry a nice young man, and I’d have a son-in-law to pal around with–but that didn’t happen. I certainly don’t love her any less. If she’s happy, what more could a parent ask for.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I have no children, but would hope I’d do the same thing you have. Gay and lesbian people don’t choose to be gay or lesbian, they just are. Some of my best friends are gay and are a never ending treat. You are a wonderful man. Alicia

    Like

    • rgayer55 says:

      For years I worked with lesbian woman who was like the sister I never had. We are still very close. I don’t understand how some people can think sexual orientation is a matter of choice. I guess if you’re closed minded you can disregard the facts and believe whatever suits your purpose.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Sad but true. Some Native Americans held them in high regard – respected what they had to say.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Wow. My heart breaks because Im sure similar stories have happened in real life.

    What a wonderfully written sad piece.

    Like

  24. hafong says:

    My partner’s brother was gay and died of Aids. He fought for gay rights and affordable housing for people with Aids in Vancouver. The McLaren House was named after him. His family is very proud of him. Thanks for writing your story.

    Lily

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Amy Reese says:

    Oh, so terribly sad, Alicia. Hopefully, his parents will surprise him with compassion. Nicely written story!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Ellespeth says:

    I’m glad Pierre has Luke in his life. These days, with good care, people with Aids can live many healthy and productive years. His parents may come around but, if not, it’s their loss. Difficult but well done piece.
    Ellespeth

    Liked by 1 person

  27. wildbilbo says:

    Ouch. Caught me with that one – quite the dramatic turn at the end. Nicely written.
    KT

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Very well told tale – it seems we both had smimlar ideas but I think yours is a much fuller story!

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Sarah Ann says:

    So painful. Pierre comes across as resigned but the anguish of what happened before is so clear. Beautifully told.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Sad, but realistic and well-written story, Alicia. That was a real heartbreaking ending. There’s so much emotion in that story. It’s done so well. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

  31. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear Alicia, Your story is so moving and I hope the parents learn to accept what is and not what they want it to be. Excellent! Nan 🙂

    Like

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