The Lesson

Posted: November 9, 2016 in Friday Fictioneers
Tags: , ,

Another Wednesday another photo prompt from Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. Thanks to Sandra Crook for providing this color photo from somewhere in France, I presume. Here is my 100-word contribution tucked amidst all the other wonderful Friday Fictioneer tales.

PHOTO PROMPT © Sandra Crook

“Orange,” the old man said.
The seven-year-old boy handed him a mosaic tile.
“This is green. I said orange.”
“But Grandpa, how can you tell?”
“Orange tiles are thick. Green are textured like sandstone.Try again.”
The boy desperately wanted to look under his blindfold, but Grandfather would get angry.
Carefully, he ran his small fingers over the tiles. “This one!”
“Yellow!” Grandfather raised his voice. “Feel the glaze!”
Tears welled in the child’s eyes. They had been working for hours.
Grandpa lifted his red-tipped cane and gently tapped the boy’s head.”No crying! One can see with more than his eyes.”

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Comments
  1. This evoked so many emotions Alicia. I wasn’t sure at the end who to feel sorry for.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. neilmacdon says:

    One can see with more than his eyes – what a lovely line

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I love where you went with this.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dear Alicia,

    Unique and beautifully written. Love it.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Iain Kelly says:

    Nice take Alicia, and a good lesson to learn.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. ellenbest24 says:

    How true, we can see so much more if we use our senses. I loved this I can feel the knock on the head. Well done.

    Like

  7. Dale says:

    That was wonderful! Hmmm… wonder why he is teaching him to see with his hands…
    (by the way, you are missing an ‘h’ for the “he ran his small hands…”)

    Liked by 1 person

    • (he ran is small fingers over the tiles – I don’t see a missing “h” anywhere! Have I gone blind myself?)
      Grandpa is trying to teach him to use all his senses. I’m imagining that Grandfather has been blind all his life. Perhaps that didn’t come through in 100 words. Maybe not kindly all the time but . . . . Thanks for reading and commenting

      Liked by 1 person

  8. rgayer55 says:

    There are many ways to perceive things, other than with our eyes. Great lesson.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. yarnspinnerr says:

    Truly an unique take and emotively written. Great write.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. draliman says:

    A strict teacher, but a valuable lesson. Nice one!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. gahlearner says:

    A strict but still gentle teacher. In the future the child will be grateful for this. And what a great idea, to make us see through a blind man’s sense of touch.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I really love the lesson tucked into this.
    Brilliantly done.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Life Lessons of a Dog Lover says:

    Nice story with a great message.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Beautiful lesson! How easily we sighted people forget our sense of touch. Because of my husband’s work schedule, I sometimes grab a shirt out of my drawer in the dark. There are several I know by touch of the fabric.

    Like

  15. Sandra says:

    Lovely. Almost reads like a parable.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. What a lovely last line, we all need to feel deeper.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Joy Pixley says:

    Sounds like a difficult lesson for Grandpa to have to learn, and now he has the best of intentions in passing it down — although his grandson may not understand that, not right away. Nicely written.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. HonieBriggs says:

    I love this! Teachable moments make the best stories. Well done.

    Like

  19. Wonderful response to the prompt, Alicia. I sensed what was coming, but the delivery was great!

    Like

  20. Oh, such a poignant piece, heartfelt. Love the way you fully show the relationship between them.

    Like

  21. Michael Wynn says:

    This was great. Some lessons take a lot of learning and the child is struggling but, Grandpa seems genuine and sympathetic

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Beautiful. A hard and exhausting lesson for the little boy but such a valuable one. Perhaps we need more blind grandfathers in our world…..

    Like

  23. It might be harsh but sometimes it’s the only way to show your love. I hope the little boy will understand.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Lynn Love says:

    There’s a tough life lesson to learn! Fingers crossed the grandson can do it – the talent will serve him well. Wonderful take on the prompt – very well written and original

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Lynn, you always say such kind things. I appreciated it (I would appreciate any critiques also – news can’t alway be good ; -) )

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        Haha! Very true. I thought it was beautifully written, the only thing I wondered was exactly why grandad was doing – I was intrigued by the context I suppose. Is there something about the society that means he wants to equip his grandson with the ability to look below the surface of things? Of course, impossible to include all that in 100 words – just interesting. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Granddad was merely teaching “life lessons” to his grandson. Look, listen, learn. Hard to get across that Granddad had been blind his whole life and learned how to maneuver through the world with that disability. There’s nothing odd about the society. So glad you asked. Alicia

    Like

  26. A creative and lovely story, Alicia. The blind are sometimes given other senses that are stronger. Good writing. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

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