Father’s Days

Posted: March 7, 2018 in Friday Fictioneers
Tags: , , , ,

Father is smiling today and I feel like a prince inside his gaze.
Yesterday, his frown made me scurry like an ant beneath his feet.
It is hard to predict when his heart will be made of stone
and the entire day promises to be rocky
or his heart will blossom with the warmth of a hundred loving fires.
Those days are so smooth and calm I wish they would last forever
but the hours click by too quickly and another morning
arrives and I am once more challenged to decipher
which Father I will meet when I rise from my bed.

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Comments
  1. neilmacdon says:

    There’s real depth there, Alicia

    Liked by 1 person

  2. James says:

    Alcoholics and diabetics can be like that (the latter because of fluctuations in blood sugar) but this could also describe some mental illnesses.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sad that this is the real world for some spouses and children. It does sound like a mental illness issue.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Alice Audrey says:

    It’s bad enough to simply live with someone who is moody. You bring out how much worse when you are a child dependent on a parent’s every whim.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dear Lish,

    It sounds like Father is bipolar. How hard to live with someone like that…especially for a child (my dad was a lot like that). Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Iain Kelly says:

    I would love to read more about the father to see if there is a reason he acts this way. Very believable characters.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. jillyfunnell says:

    A child has little choice but to watch and wait and hope for the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Dale says:

    Very well done, Alicia. I can’t imagine a poor child trying to deal with a bipolar (that’s what he sounds like) father. Not knowing which one he will wake up to. Gonna grow up way before his time, methinks.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wonderful writing. You have really made full use of the prompt in a creative but very real way.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Awwe, that is so sad. Poor girl.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I cannot imagine what that must be like.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. pennygadd51 says:

    Your story makes the child’s difficulty clear; he has to be constantly watchful of his father’s moods. You show us the stress this causes. The story makes us speculate about the father’s problems, and why he should be like this. It’s a very good story, Alicia.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. subroto says:

    A sad world for a child to be living with a mentally ill parent. The child’s fear and confusion comes through in the story.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. ceayr says:

    I love this.
    The long flowing sentences draw us irresistibly in.
    I suspect there is a depth here that is hidden from prying eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. draliman says:

    Sounds like a childhood spent walking on eggshells. An alcoholic or someone suffering from dementia, perhaps?

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Sandra says:

    That was simply beautiful, Alicia. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. This sounds like such a damaging, difficult relationship. So stressful. I hope this child has a safe hand to hold when they need it.

    Like

  18. Like your story very much, so well constructed. You say so much about this relationship, so recognisable and thought provoking.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I do hope he doesn’t hurt him, I have a nasty suspicion he will…

    Hey, Lish, found an interesting fact out the other day, apparently Mother Theresea was a real pain in the proverbial to work with. Not sure of the validity of this fact (it was imparted in a video conference) but it might explain your Father character, maybe…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh, that is an interesting fact. Sometimes I think saintly people HAVE to have moments of anger and frustration and be a little bit edgy in order to get things done. My mother was no Mother Teresa but she was a truly “saintly” woman with some bite.

      Thanks for reading and opening a conversation!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. What a chilling environment to grow up in… there are so many reasons it can be so, but for a child it might matter less…

    Liked by 1 person

  21. granonine says:

    My therapist brain immediately clicks into gear. Bipolar? Schizophrenia? or just a sad, troubled man?

    Liked by 1 person

  22. plaridel says:

    what a hell he finds himself in. he deserves something better.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Varad says:

    Nice bit of characterization of the father, Alicia. The poor boy’s life would be one confused mess.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Sarah Ann says:

    Wonderful imagery of a father’s changing moods. This is not an environment any child should have to live in. A beautifully rendered unsettling childhood existence.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. yarnspinnerr says:

    I too am wary of unpredictably moody people. Had a boss like that once. Great tale.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I get an Old Testament vibe from the story. Probably not what you had in mind. I think it’s the language you deployed.
    (And I haven’t read the OT since I was 16, so a year or so back.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Delightful. I meant to portray an old-world feeling, if not the Old Testament, so didn’t use any contractions. Perhaps that’s the vibe you felt? I appreciate your input. Thanks

      Like

  27. Your story has several layers and like a onion each peel reveals a new layer that opens up endless questions that beg endless answers. A very well structured and masterfully written short story. Alicia.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Lovely but sad description of life lived in eggshells. I feel for your protagonist.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. liz young says:

    What a challenge this son faces every day.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Well done. This is familiar. I had a family member like this. Some days you had to tiptoe.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. rgayer55 says:

    My Dad’s dementia made him unpredictable at times–or even within a single moment. It was bad enough for us kids, but must have been really challenging for Mom.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sorry! My dad a wee bit of dementia but he was 94. He earned it by aging, not due to his brain giving up on him. Does that make sense? When my sisters and I were taking care of him and mom he knew exactly where the tax stuff was, what was owed, what wasn’t. Thanks for sharing! Lish

      Liked by 1 person

      • rgayer55 says:

        My Dad died 5 days after his 95th birthday. Evidently, he’d been having mini-strokes for quite a long time before it was discovered. For the most part, both him and Mom were very healthy right up to the end. She lived to be 93. We were very blessed to have them that long.

        Like

  32. Lynn Love says:

    I noticed those calm waters against the strange collection of stones too – makes the mind wander. As the child of a temperamental father, I feel this very deeply. All in our house focused around pleasing Dad, keeping him in a good mood if we could and when we couldn’t … Well, you can imagine. I’m still a ‘people pleaser’ to this day and I put it down to those formative years. So well written, hit the perfect tone with the perfect voice. Brava Lish. I genuinely love your writing – no people pleasing in that comment either! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I know you’re not looking for sympathy, but I’m sorry you had a rocky childhood. I never knew how hard a child’s life could be until I found our a close childhood friend’s father was an alcoholic and beat him, and another’s little brother had been molested by a neighbor. That just didn’t happen in my family-world. Thanks for sharing and thanks for your kind praise. Lish

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lynn Love says:

        I can’t complain Lish. He had a temper but things could have been much, much worse. You captured it so well, though – the walking on egg shells, the need to please. Expertly done X

        Like

  33. Thom Carswell says:

    Lovely imagery and an original take on the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. athling2001 says:

    Intriguing and so much is left unsaid. Still, the basis of the story comes through loud and clear. I hope to learn more.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. lisarey1990 says:

    Brilliantly written with lots of depth.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Moon says:

    The father seems to be a victim of manic – depressive disorder. I feel for the child, especially since he still cares and craves for his affection, despite everything.
    Beautifully written, as always.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Laurie Bell says:

    Woah thats so tense. Well told. What a terrify scenario not knowing what will wake up

    Liked by 1 person

  38. A sad tale, Alicia. It’s difficult to imagine that behavior in a person. Yet, it does exist.
    Mental illness isn’t addressed as much as it should be addressed. There’s still teh stigma.
    Nicley done, my friend. Have a glroious weekend.
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

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