A Band of Sisters

Posted: August 22, 2018 in Friday Fictioneers
Tags: , ,

Life moves smoothly when our men are gone to sea, hunting and processing whales for five years or more.
Babies arrive during the first year. Then, finally, we’re free from that routine.
Our boys become kind and thoughtful without men chiding Only snivelers cry.
Our girls become beauties without men eyeing them with intent.
And we, the women, follow rules created among us, sans the hindrance of ego and imagined power.
A singular sadness falls on our shoulders when we first spy the whalers returning.
We retire to our homes, remove our husband’s pants and don uncomfortable corsets and dresses.

 

 

Comments
  1. neilmacdon says:

    A powerful fable. Like Rosie the Riveter

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I read an article in National Geographic about how well women did when the men went whaling back when it was a sadly booming industry. The villages established a whole new way of life that was interrupted when the whalers came home. Sometimes the women won out and nothing changed just because there was a man around.

    Like

  3. Iain Kelly says:

    If the roles were reversed I’m not so sure the men would have flourished so well. Reminds me of the similar situation during the world wars too, when women took over the jobs at home while the men were away fighting, and when the men returned, were expected to return to the house and give up the jobs. Thought provoking story, well done.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dale says:

    I would like to see the women revolt…. Not meekly return to their “wifely ways”…
    Loved this, Alicia.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. prior.. says:

    laughed at the husband’s pants line – and it was also then that the time period sank in (no pun intended)

    Liked by 1 person

  6. StuHN says:

    YAY. You’re back! Whalers always take me to the 1800’s, I think the line that got me was about the men with intent on seeing the beauty of the young girls/teen/etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. granonine says:

    Somehow this struck me as both hilarious and pitiful. Is that possible?

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The lesson of this magical time was surely lost on the menfolk. I have thrived, in these times, by carefully watching and emulating the women around me at work, and staying out of their way.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Lynn Love says:

    Love this story. All those women creating their own society with its own rules while the men go off to ply their barbarous trade. Sounds pretty idyllic to me! Great story Lish

    Liked by 1 person

  10. draliman says:

    A bit “anti-man” 😉 Back in those days I can see where they’re coming from, though. It must have been such a relief to be out from under the thumb and get some freedom. And a nice change to the usual “men away” story, where the women always seem to be pining for them 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. With all the boys being so kind and thoughtful, I wonder where the next generation of whalers will come from? We men do tend to screw up a woman’s world, don’t we. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. plaridel says:

    it’s a whale of a tale. just loved it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Dear Lish,

    I realize this is based on history and a wonderful job of it at that but it went deeper. Sometimes I feel that corset’s pinch in this day and age. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for seeing that these women had such freedom wearing pants and dealing with the world as they saw fit, then the men returning expecting their wives bound to their rules.

      Like

  14. Sarah Ann says:

    Such a wonderful insight into the thoughts of women left to life without the hindrance of men, for however short a time.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. pennygadd51 says:

    You’ve constructed your story well and written it fluently.
    “sans the hindrance of ego and imagined power” sums up the reason why the arrangement works, I suspect. Wouldn’t it be great if we could find a political system that would reduce the hindrance of ego and imagined power?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes! Bring it on. I can’t remember which of the indigenous people in the US had a great system. The men would talk, the women would talk, each would come up with a plan and they’d get together and come up with a solution everyone could agree on. How civilized. None of this, “Me Tarzan.” bologna. Thank, Penny

      Liked by 1 person

  16. 4963andypop says:

    I imagine this how the how the Amazons of Greek legend started out…Those whalers had better watch their backs. A harpoon may be coming their way!:)

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Love this story Alicia- life for the women without the men so well observed. A powerful message told in a brilliantly understated way.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Jelli says:

    Words with a punch! Love it! Have a great week, Alicia!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Liz Young says:

    A powerful story, and my sympathies are all wth the women!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. magarisa says:

    Oh why, oh why did the men have to return? Perhaps a few of the women dared to continue wearing their husband’s pants instead of corsets and dresses.
    A beautifully crafted tale.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. gahlearner says:

    Outstanding, Alicia. I love how you incluce the boys into growing up with better attitudes without the menfolks antiquated ‘manly ways’. What a waste of potential and talent to exclude half of the population from having a say because of gender (or skin colour, or country of origin…).

    Liked by 1 person

  22. lisarey1990 says:

    I love it! Outstanding write.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. jillyfunnell says:

    Such an interesting story. Of course my romantic streak longs for some of those returning men to be totally loveable gentlemen who enhance their families’ lives. But my practical side thinks of the corsets, the discomfort and the extra cooking and washing and the mess and the smell of whale meat.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I love this!
    Sometimes I wonder if a gender divided society might be better, with intermittent visits.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Wow…this almost sounded like a utopia!

    Liked by 1 person

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