Interrupted Plans

Posted: September 26, 2018 in Friday Fictioneers
Tags: , , , ,

Our purple-clad Fairy Blog Mother kindly posted today’s photo prompt provided by Yvette Prior. This picture was a mind-boggler for me. Still, here are my 100-words.

On one side, everything is organized.
Grocery lists. Children’s schedules. Doctor’s appointments.
On the other, it feels like a hurricane whistled through and tumbled everything around.
Where are the keys? Did Roger leave me forever? I must walk the dog.
Too late. Time for dinner.
Stephanie opens the fridge, removes barbequed salmon, tartar sauce, coleslaw, and mashed potatoes.
She feels quite brilliant for having planned ahead.
When Roger comes home – yes, he’s only gone to work – the table will be set.
She startles when gentle hands turn her around.
“Come back to bed, my sweet. It’s half past midnight.”

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Comments
  1. Iain Kelly says:

    Well written, I felt like it was simple everyday life that had broken her down, topped off by Roger leaving her.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I thought she was having a night mare or a bad dream, but dementia seems perfect. A gentle piece, made sad upon realisation of what is really going on.
    Well written.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Dale says:

    I actually thought she was sleepwalking whilst dreaming…
    But dementia makes way more sense.
    Such a scary disease. Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. neilmacdon says:

    I loved “Where are the keys? Did Roger leave me forever? I must walk the dog.”

    Liked by 1 person

  5. draliman says:

    Nice twist, I was drawn into a simple “hectic lifestyle”, then such a sad ending.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. ceayr says:

    Oh Alicia, this is terrific. Heart-rending, but superbly done.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Abhijit Ray says:

    Is she suffering from mental problem? Who is in bed?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sandra says:

      Heartbreaking. It seemed like a frenzy of cunfusion rather than a drifting fog of dementia, but I guess there are different points of the spectrum of this dreadful condition. Really well done, Alicia.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks, Sandra. I just talked to a friend whose uncle shot himself after he thought his wife died from a stroke. Neither her aunt nor uncle told anyone he had dementia so no one was there to keep an eye on him while she was in the hospital. Sad.

        Like

  8. Jelli says:

    sleepwalking, again… been there done that… cooked an entire meal once. Hubby just shakes his head, puts the food in the fridge and puts me back to bed.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Liz Young says:

    She’s up in the night planning dinner? I think she’s sliding into dementia and has a very understanding husband. Well drawn.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. plaridel says:

    it looks like she’s sleep walking again. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Oh, I was feeling all happy for her. Roger comes home. And, then, gulp. So sad. You did that so well, Alicia. I’ve even got tears in my eyes!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Dear Lish,

    Although I skimmed through the comment section, I had already figured that she has dementia. What a cruel thing it is, too. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Sarah Ann says:

    So sad and so good. The last line reveals the mess and tumble of Stephanie’s mind, the lack of order, the forgetting, and Roger’s love and wish to keep her safe.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Sleepwalking or something more serious? I fear the latter.

    Click to read my FriFic tale!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. pennygadd51 says:

    Oh, Lish, you broke my heart with the last two lines. Instant tears. That is so very, very well written, with the mixture of order and confusion. Absolutely beautiful. Story of the week for me. xx

    Liked by 1 person

  16. granonine says:

    Wonderful twist at the end. The story was believable. I’ve done things like that when I was younger, under a lot of stress. Excellent story.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. lisarey1990 says:

    Being learning a lot about dementia lately as my sister has started a Healthcare course. You wrote it perfectly.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. StuHN says:

    That was tender sweet. Alzheimer’s sucks.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. You have portrayed the confusion and the fight for lucidness perfectly. The drain on the caregiver is a monstrous responsibility. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. subroto says:

    Such a sad story. She is trapped in her own mind while Roger is there to guide her now but it is going to get harder as time goes by.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Alice Audrey says:

    Alzheimer’s? It feels like she’s slipping a bit, though I can’t decide just how out of whack she is.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I remember those early stages with my mother… when it goes worse you smile fondly at the memories… My mother was visiting with my sister in my family to our house and they found her walking around our hose in the middle of the night claiming that she had to let the carpenter in…

    Liked by 1 person

  23. jillyfunnell says:

    The random thoughts pulled me in one direction, then I realised there was serious confusion. Sad. Well-written story.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. The dementia came through loud & clear to me, Lish. It must be terrible to realize the disease is overcoming you and you’re powerless to stop it. It got my dad. Those were some long tough days–especially for my mom.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Wow…that is a confused woman!
    So sad how that disease detroys us.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh gosh that last line is great. Who hasn’t stressed so much that time does funny things? Well told

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Sad realistic depiction of what it must be like to have Alzheimer’s Disease

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Hi Alicia,
    I was looking for your recent FF story. This seems to be the last one you wrote.
    I’m trying to get back to commenting and blogging again.
    I have many, many friends with dementia and altzheimer. I thought you were going
    in that direction but wasn’t sure. The ending jolted me right there. I loved the way you
    took us through the routine of order and chaos which happens often with people who
    have this disease. Beuatifully written …. loved it. : )
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Isadora. I’ve been spotty about writing due to the class I teach. Also, I’ve been taking a Dance Blast class right after aerobics so am home kind of late in the day. PLUS when I’m not going to have time to comment on other’s pieces, I don’t submit one of my own. I hope you are back for a while. Alicia

      Liked by 1 person

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