Unbound

Posted: April 18, 2018 in Friday Fictioneers
Tags: , , , , ,

Black doesn’t suit her for she craves fuschia, amber, mauve, and cyan.
Peacock feathers and shiny gold beads are the things she needs
yes, needs to weave through her vibrant red hair.
Not this dark, veiled hat that covers her curls and hides her striking blue eyes.

But funerals demand black, scream for tears.
For one day, she’ll provide both.
A trip to Goodwill, menthol smeared beneath her eyes.
Sure, she can be the grieving widow for a day,
smile over tuna casserole and peach pie.

All she has ever wanted is everything he owned.
And, oh yes, now she has it.

Comments
  1. neilmacdon says:

    I liked the way you used colour there

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Iain Kelly says:

    And now she has it, it seems!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh I hope this is the second part to my story… she might actually deserve it…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Loved this – so full of imagery and so intriguing. You’ve left me wanting to know more!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Interesting stories this week. What triggered this story? I like it but I’m wondering what was the trigger. I was torn between a serial killer and a pick up driving cowboy. Very strange week, nothing predictable. I like it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The frisbee cage reminded me of a pillbox hat with netting. The darkness of the scene is somber which invoked a funeral atmosphere. Ta-da “Unbound” was born. You’re right, many interpretations this week. I, too, thought about cowboys, not so much serial killers. Thanks for reading and wondering!

      Liked by 4 people

  6. Dale says:

    The merry widow, playing at sadness for a day… hmmm… makes one wonder why she is not overly sad…

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sandra says:

    Lovely palette of colours and bereavement techniques, Alicia. I couldn’t help liking the woman and admiring the route of your inspiration. That last line doesn’t sit comfortably with me, grammatically, in relation to the line before, though I know what you’re saying.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Sandra. And thanks for the critique. Any suggestions? I’ve reread it and come up with nada.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sandra says:

        I think it’s because ‘does’ doesn’t link to anything in the preceding sentence. The best I can come up with is “All she has ever wanted is everything he owned.
        And, oh yes, now she has that.” Because ‘does’ kind of begs ‘does what?’ To my mind, the penultimate sentence would have to read “all she has ever wanted is to have everything he ever owned’ in order for ‘And now she does (have everything he ever owned)’ to read correctly. It’s a nitpicky point which would only be of interest to a pedant like me. 😉 Sorry!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Good heavens! Don’t be sorry! I love to learn more and more each day. (Plus I hate confusing people with incorrect grammar, even as I hate being confused!) I’ll work on that last sentence. Thank you kindly.

        Like

      • ceayr says:

        Lessons from the best are to be treasured, Alicia.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Lynn Love says:

    The Black Widow for the day and then back to technicolor. Beautifully written Lish, love the vibrancy of the descriptions, the colours, her suppressed desires. Not sure if I love her or loathe her – depends what he was like really. Wonderful

    Liked by 1 person

  9. draliman says:

    It was good of her to go to such lengths to appear the grieving widow, anyway 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. granonine says:

    Menthol smeared under her eyes. Goodness. What a cold woman!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I googled how to make fake tears. She is rather harsh. Perhaps for good reason. Somehow the pickup truck in the back made me think of an unkind man although my husband, the nicest guy in the whole world, drives a pickup. It’s mainly a small work truck for his carpentry jobs. Thanks for reading.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Fluid Phrase says:

    That’s a great story. Reads like a poem. Leaves much unsaid and clear at the same time. Loved it.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. plaridel says:

    she doesn’t look like a widow in sorrow deep inside.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. subroto says:

    Crying on the outside but smiling within. Ooh she is wicked indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. pennygadd51 says:

    Your story made me wonder how anyone could rejoice in the death of someone with whom she’d shared a life. Even if the partner had been abusive, they would have been a close human presence. I suppose your MC is, to a certain extent, psychopathic.
    Now, I noticed the colours you chose as those she needed in her vibrant red hair. You’re an accomplished writer, and you’ve chosen those colours carefully. Are you using them to indicate something fundamental about her character? (I say this with great trepidation, noting your own vibrant red hair and bearing in mind that you may have picked your own favourite colours…!)
    Good story, Alicia!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for wondering all those things, Penny. I think if one is completely selfish and free of emotion they could look at the death of another as “just something that happened.” And this woman certainly is. The colors? I liked the rhythm of them and the fact that they weren’t merely pink or blue or green. And peacock feathers fascinate me no end! Some many shimmering colors!

      Like

  15. lisarey1990 says:

    I was left wondering for a few seconds if she killed him. Clearly I’m reading too many murder mysteries! 🙂 Brilliant story. So intriguing up to the end.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I read Bjorn’s story moments before I got here. The two fit nicely together. You painted a beautiful picture of her. I can just see the flaming hair and captivating blue eyes.
    The caged bird is free at last!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Dear Lish,

    Don’t know whether she’s a grieving widow or a triumphant gold digger. Beautifully colorful and well written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  18. yarnspinnerr says:

    The use of colors is simply awesome. Wonderful story.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Norma says:

    Sure, she can be the grieving widow for a day because after that everything and all the colours will be hers. Loved the vibrancy of the first two lines and the contrasting revelation brought in the second para.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. jillyfunnell says:

    Smearing menthol under the eyes to feign tears – honestly, Alicia, this Friday Fictioneers game is so totally educational 😉 Loved your black widow and her resolve as she anticipated the funeral tea of tuna casserole and peach pie – which actually sounds quite appetising. Love your stories, Jilly.

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a wonderful thing to say, Jilly. It’s crazy how, when writing, one suddenly thinks, ‘How the heck does someone produce fake tears?’ Then you Google it and there it is!!! As writers, we must hope no one looks at the trail of thinks we’ve researched. *how to poison someone. *fake tear. *gunshot wounds

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Wonderful story but so sad that someone is loved only for what can be gained from them after death. I’m afraid I don’t like your character Alicia which means you’ve written her well.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. gahlearner says:

    What a cold woman. Your writing is so vivid, I can see her, fake tears and all.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Ha ha ha, that was a wicked ending.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I thought this was great, the selfishness and avarice of the woman came over brilliantly with her yearning for the colours she chose and wanted.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. LOL…yes, I think she can do this, for this one day.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Oh, how villainous! She’ll get it all, and whatever consequences there be.

    There was a local case years ago where the husband supposedly drowned in a shallow lake — no body ever found. Wife’s word only about what happened. The grieving widow (married only two years) cashed in everything, his prosperous farm and insurance policy, and left the area. But life has a way of snagging people’s plans. She lost the battle with cancer just a few years later, leaving everyone to wonder…

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Sarah Ann says:

    Menthol under the eyes says it all. I imagine she will be throwing off her black with gay abandon later, and I’m left wondering if she helped her husband along …

    Liked by 1 person

  28. ceayr says:

    I love this piece, it tells so much, yet leaves so much to the reader.
    Wonderful

    Liked by 1 person

  29. I wonder if she didn’t have a hand in becoming a widow.. She seems cunningly clever.

    Great story, very vivid and fun to read!!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Laurie Bell says:

    Oooooo creepy motivations here. Well told. Love the vibrant colours mixed with black

    Liked by 1 person

  31. MythRider says:

    oh, now this is devious. Good beginning to a longer story.
    Phyllis

    Liked by 1 person

  32. What a wonderfully Gothic flavour to your tale Alicia, I can almost hear the widow purring with self-satisfaction !You ‘paint ‘the scene so effectively. Like the touch of menthol smeared beneath her eyes for grief…

    Liked by 1 person

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